New research: Mask wearing amplifies harms of cigarette smoking

New research: Mask wearing amplifies harms of cigarette smoking

The researchers investigated the levels of exhaled carbon monoxide in smokers while wearing a mask during working hours, and during days without a mask.

Smoking while wearing a surgical mask results in a two-fold rise in exhaled carbon monoxide and impaired blood vessel function compared to non-mask periods, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

The study focused on traditional (combustible) cigarettes and non-combustible cigarettes (containing tobacco that is electronically heated). It did not include e-cigarettes, which electronically heat a liquid containing nicotine.

The study included 40 smokers of conventional cigarettes, 40 non-combustible cigarette users and 40 non-smokers. The researchers investigated the levels of exhaled carbon monoxide in smokers while wearing a mask during working hours, and during days without a mask.

In conventional cigarette smokers, exhaled carbon monoxide increased from 8.00 parts per million (baseline) to 12.15 ppm with no mask, and 17.45 ppm with a mask. In non-combustible cigarette smokers, it rose from 1.15 ppm to 1.43 ppm with no mask, and 2.20 ppm with a mask.

Among non-smokers, exhaled carbon monoxide did not differ between baseline, non-mask and mask periods.

Source: Indian Express

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